Harbour City, W1D 5QH

Harbour City was a Chinese restaurant on Gerrard Street in Chinatown, serving dim sum. It has now closed. As of early 2016 the premises are occupied by another restaurant called Food House (風味食堂).

The information below is retained for historical purposes.

Chinese restaurant on Gerrard Street in Chinatown, serving dim sum between noon and 5pm. It can seat quite a few people, with dining areas on three floors — ground, first, and second.

Kake and three other Perlmongers visited for dim sum on a Friday lunchtime in July 2010 and had no trouble getting a table (we arrived around 1pm). Marinated octopus (£2.50) arrived first, and was really pretty good; nice non-chewy texture, and a subtle flavour of toasted sesame oil. The wrappers on the har gao (£2.40) were perhaps a little too thick. Scallop cheung fun (£3.60) had nicely cooked large scallops and well-textured, not-too-thick noodles. Vietnamese spring rolls (£2.10) photo came with a very good non-generic chilli sauce, though the texture of the filling was a little coarse. Ma lai goh (steamed sponge cake; £2.10) photo was very light in texture, and not too sweet. We ended up paying £11 head in total, for plenty of food.

On a previous visit by much the same group in February 2008, the stand-out dishes were the scallop cheung fun (as above) and the miniature roast pork pies (£2; good pastry, not too much sweetness, and a fairly decent amount of pork). Fried taro paste (£2.20) was also good. Ginger beef dumplings (£1.90), crab meat and coriander dumplings (£2.20), and barbecued pork cheung fun (£2.50) were all quite competent. Shanghai-style meat and vegetable dumplings (£1.90) were fairly devoid of soup, unfortunately. Overall, though, everything was pretty good. Tea was fine, not too strong, and the teapot was refilled promptly. Service was efficient and not unfriendly. We ended up paying £10 apiece for slightly more food than we actually needed.

Accessibility: Three high steps up to get in. Toilets are in the basement (down a flight of stairs with a sturdy handrail on one side; cubicles in the ladies' are a bit narrow but the doors open outwards into a reasonable sized vestibule) and on the second floor.

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Last visited by Kake and other Perlmongers, July 2010.

Last edited 2016-01-23 17:23:17 (version 11; diff). List all versions.